Mike Hoffman
Martha Hennessy
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Barbara Golder
Francis Etheredge
Grace Avellana Villamora
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Irene Gonzalez-Hernandez
Father James Martin, S.J.
karen clifton
Father Jake Martin, SJ
Razia Khokhar
Father Joseph Chamblain, O.S.M.
Julia Hess, CRW
Father Greg Sakowicz
sally
kurt koch
Denise Mackura
Marco Lo Russo
An Interview with Kirsten Mahon
Cardinal Blase Cupich
sigrid fry-rever
fisher
Eileen Mathy
father shay
Sister Sharon Dillon, S.S.J.
CHRISTIAN PESCHKEN
Maria Hawk, Ed.D.
robert
alexis samet
Mossimo
Dawn M. Nothwehr, OSF, PhD
Rabbi Dr. Ronald Kronish
Alexandra Carroll
Mkenda SJ
Carmen Julia Rodriguez
Father. Charlie B. Chilufya, S.J
sister simone

The mission of Profiles in Catholicism is to interview people of faith to learn more about the spiritual, societal, and health issues that are important to them, promote evangelization and religious vocations,  provide financial support to people with cancer, HIV/AIDS, those living in extreme poverty, and the organizations that help them, and provide news updates.

special prayer

A Prayer for Healing Victims of Abuse

God of endless love, ever caring, ever strong, always present, always just: You gave your only Son to save us by his blood on the cross.

Gentle Jesus, shepherd of peace, join to your own suffering the pain of all who have been hurt in body, mind, and spirit by those who betrayed the trust placed in them.

Hear the cries of our brothers and sisters who have been gravely harmed, and the cries of those who love them. Soothe their restless hearts with hope, steady their shaken spirits with faith.

Grant them justice for their cause, enlightened by your truth. Holy Spirit, comforter of hearts, heal your people’s wounds and transform brokenness into wholeness.

Grant us the courage and wisdom, humility, and grace, to act with justice. Breathe wisdom into our prayers and labors. Grant that all harmed by abuse may find peace in justice. We ask this through Christ, our Lord. Amen.

by The Paulist Center

A Quote to Remember

“The term dissociation is ordinarily used to describe the phenomenon of compartmentalization or fragmentation of mental contents. It does not ascribe any particular mechanism by which the dissociative process occurs. Does dissociation occur as a result of automatic, nonconscious processes, or are there other specific mechanisms by which it occurs? Especially in the context of describing amnesia, the term repression is widely used in connection with several different mechanisms. As it is commonly used, it often implies how individuals may block our memories of uncomfortable or conflictual experiences. If done consciously, the mechanism is more accurately called suppression, which results from actively trying not to think about negative experiences.”

by James A. Chu, Rebuilding Shattered Lives: Treating Complex PTSD and Dissociative Disorders

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